First, the House Plans

First, the House Plans

Career Education Center’s first home build is already underway

 

House plans

 

 

 

 

One of the most ambitious projects of the new Career Education Center came from an idea proposed by Construction teacher Scott Little.

 

He wanted to include a space where his students – and those of other trades such as electrical and plumbing – could build a real house on the school premises every couple of years.

 

That dream is already becoming a reality, even though the Career Education Center is just finishing its first year of operation. Already, architecture students  have completed the plans for the newly designed house and now construction students are breaking ground to begin construction.

 

Construction of the small house will continue into the 2018-2019 school year.

 

First Things First

 

From the beginning, the project was designed to include students from a variety of endorsement areas. Architecture students would design the house; construction students would build it; electrical students would wire it; plumbing students would plumb it; and marketing students would sell it.

 

That meant the project would start in the architecture lab. During the 2017-2018 school year, each of Amy Hughes’ architecture students proposed a design for the house.

 

Mr. Little visited her class, explaining to students the vision for the house and its necessary limitations, around which their designs must revolve.

 

He proposed a small house, like a lake home, that would not be a primary residence but more of a second home set on an acreage with beautiful views that should be highlighted with windows.

 

Because the home would be built on the Career Education Center lot and later transported to the buyer’s property, it would be limited to dimensions that would allow highway travel.

 

Class designs were narrowed down to three, then to the final design by junior Donovan Williams. He also used the project as his competition submission to Skills USA. In all, four architecture students went to state competition with their small home designs.

 

When Mr. Little changed his mind from wanting a contemporary structure to later preferring a more traditional look, students got the typical experience of serving a client who makes changes in the project, said Mrs. Hughes.

 

With the plans for the house complete in early spring, the project was passed to construction students.

 

For the next year, construction students will be bringing the plans to life. Eventually, they will draw in the skills of student electricians and plumbers to complete it, then the marketing students to sell it.